Snowbirding 2017 Postcards: Colorado River Boat Ride

I’d only intended to spend one night at Willow Beach Campground, in preparation for about a week off the grid in the Turtleback as I make my way to Sacramento for my late winter/early spring work. Recharge batteries, dump wastewater tanks, fill fresh water tank, take a good, long shower. Normal prep stuff.

But when I saw the boat rentals and the smooth surface of the Colorado River at the upper end of Lake Mojave in Black Canyon, I thought it might be good to stick around for another day. And when I realized that the Arizona Hot Springs, which I blog about in another post, might be accessible from the river, I added a day to my campsite reservation. 

(That’s the beauty of traveling without a ball and chain; you can change your plans at any time and not have to listen to anyone whining about it.)

I rented the smallest boat they had for half a day and headed out at around 11 AM with Penny, my camera, a towel, and a packed lunch. I may have been the first power boat up that section of the river that morning — the water was completely smooth and glassy. The canyon started out wide, with lots of water fowl that scattered on my approach. But it soon got narrower and narrower, with canyon walls towering over the water. I had flown over this part of the river several times over the past 15 or so years and it’s beautiful from the air. But it might be even prettier from the water with the canyon walls reflecting on its surface.

Here are a few of the photos I took that morning. I’d hoped to do some exploring on the way back, but I spent too much time at the Hot Springs and had to get the boat back by three. Next year, I hope to bring my own boat on my snowbirding adventures.





Snowbirding 2017 Postcards: Arizona Hot Springs

I need to start off by saying that these hot springs were, by far, the absolute best hot springs I have ever visited in my life.

Tucked away in a slot canyon less than a half a mile from the Colorado River, Arizona — or, more properly, Ringbolt — Hot Springs consist of three “tubs” created by using sandbags as dams between the canyon walls. Hot water emerges from cracks in the walls to fill the first tub with very hot water — so hot I couldn’t sit in it. The water cascades over the sandbag dam to the next tub, which is cooler. The same happens to fill the third tub with even cooler water. (According to one regular, water temperatures are 102 to 115 degrees F.) Each tub had a gravelly sand floor and various depths, the deepest part being perfect for submerging up to your neck while sitting on the ground. The water was clean and algae free. There was no slime or nasty sulphuric smell. Although there may have been as many as a dozen people there at a time, it was never what I would call crowded.

This Hot Spring is accessible by a long, 2 mile hike down a trail from route 93 or by a much shorter hike up from the Colorado River. This physical limitation in access is likely what keeps it so pristine; there was absolutely no litter.  I choose the river route and rented a boat to make the 10 mile river trip up from Willow Beach. The boat trip was beautiful with many interesting spots along the way — I’ll save that for another set of postcards.

Here are a few pictures that I took along the hike to the hot spring and at the spring itself. The hike started on a dry beach and soon entered a narrow slot canyon with ever-growing trickles of warm water. There was a bit of scrambling up rocky cascades, some of which were slippery. The trickiest part of the whole trip was getting Penny up the 20 foot ladder to where the tubs were.

Along the trail to the hot spring.


There were a few places where we had to scramble up Cascades of warm water.


This 20-foot ladder was securely fastened to the canyon walls.


The third, coolest tub was the first one we reached.


The shallow end of the third tub had very warm water from the second tub.

Penny watches from the dam at the end of the third tub. She did swim twice in that tub, although she didn’t like it.


The first and hottest of the tubs was the last one I reached. I didn’t soak in it at all.


Our lunch spot just downstream from the tubs.


We spent more than two hours at the springs. I soaked mostly in the deep ends of the second and third tubs. The first tub was simply too hot for me and just about everyone else. The people who were there were mostly young and outdoorsy — I might have been the oldest one there! I very much enjoyed the company of three medical students from Syracuse who were making the most of their trip to Vegas for a convention. I also had a great conversation with a local who told me about another hot spring I might pass near in my travels later this week.